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Ga. health rankings: Fulton County

Ga. health rankings: Fulton County

(WXIA) -- A new report offers detailed health statistics for each of Georgia's counties.

The findings, which are posted at countyhealthrankings.org, determined that Forsyth is Georgia's healthiest county. Early is the least healthy.

Fulton is Georgia's 20th healthiest county, according to the data. It ranks 24th for quality of life, 6th for health behaviors (such as smoking and obesity), 14th for clinical care, 60th for social and economic factors (like graduation rates and violent crimes), and 156th for physical environment.

Here are some interesting takeaways about Fulton County:

Spelman College Museum of Fine Art hosts a Contemplative Retreat for Self-Healing

Spelman College Museum of Fine Art hosts a Contemplative Retreat for Self-Healing

The Spelman College Museum of Fine Art will host “Are You Sure, Sweetheart, That You Want To Be Well?:,” a contemplative retreat for self-healing, Saturday, March 21, from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Veta Goler, Ph.D., associate professor of dance and co-director of the Spelman College Teaching Resource and Research Center, will guide attendees through a lively mix of movement, reflection, and creative art-making to develop a deeper connection with his/herself. The mission is for participants to reconnect to the source of their inspiration and gain strength, courage, and tools to live more dynamically despite the challenges of daily life.

Fulton County to offers lactation and nutrition education classes

Fulton County to offers lactation and nutrition education classes

FULTON COUNTY, Ga. -- The journey to motherhood is different for every woman. Usually, the first decision she will make as a mom will be how to feed her child.

Fulton County Cooperative Extension, in partnership with WellCare, will sponsor lactation and nutrition education classes to provide facts about breastfeeding and to give practical tips on how to make breastfeeding work while getting the support every mother needs. Pre-registration is required.

The classes will take place at 10 a.m. in the Cooperative Extension office which is located on the first floor of the Central Atlanta Library, One Margaret Mitchell Square, Suite 109, Atlanta. Classes will be held:

* Wednesday, March 11
* Thursday, April 23
* Thursday, May 14
* Thursday, October 15

For more information and to register, call 404-332-2400.

Adamsville Career Center to host ResCare recruitment

Adamsville Career Center to host ResCare recruitment

ATLANTA -- The Adamsville Career Center of the Fulton County Office of Workforce Development will host a ResCare workforce service recruitment on Wednesday, Feb. 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

ResCare will be conducting interviews for the positions of in-home certified nursing assistant (CNA) and in-home personal care assistant (PCA).

The Adamsville Career Center is located at 3700 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (inside the Adamsville Regional Health Center).

The PCA positions as well as CNA positions require various levels of providing clients with personal care, and self-help assistance, which include hygiene and personal grooming, monitoring the condition of clients as well as administering CPR. Both positions will require moderate travel. 

AAOI celebrates 16 years of standing up to HIV

AAOI celebrates 16 years of standing up to HIV

ATLANTA -- The Atlanta Area Outreach Initiative (AAOI) will be celebrating its 16th year with an event that will prove to have a significant and lasting impact on the HIV epidemic within the metropolitan Atlanta area.

The AAOI event will focus on getting individuals who are not in care linked to care and providing information about preventing the spread of the HIV disease. The event will be held on Saturday, Feb. 7 from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Loudermilk Center, located at 40 Courtland Street in Downtown Atlanta.

Fulton County Board of Commissioners Chairman John H. Eaves, Ph.D. and Fulton County District 4 Commissioner Joan P. Garner will be special guest speakers addressing the theme of “Our Community – Our Responsibility,” highlighting the need for testing, prevention and care. Chairman Eaves serves as the chief elected official for the 20-county Metropolitan Atlanta HIV Health Services Planning Council and the Ryan White Part A Program.

Kecia Johnson using AIDS diagnosis to help her community

Kecia Johnson using AIDS diagnosis to help her community

ATLANTA -- Most people find it strange how peaceful Kecia Johnson is living with a disease the world frowns upon.

Kecia grew up with a good family, she went to college, and she got a bachelor's degree. Everything you would expect to happen to someone with great family support was happening in Kecia’s life. Until one day Kecia fell sick and was told she had AIDS -- not HIV.

Kecia was 22 years old when she found out. She had mixed emotions, and the negative opinions of others caused Kecia to hide her diagnosis for two years from her family, including her mother Dr. Wendy Johnson. After time Kecia realized that God’s purpose in this was not to make her less of a woman, but to make her more of a woman because she was the shining light to stop the stigma of what society think AIDS should look like or come from.

Ex-Grady Memorial Hospital payroll director convicted of embezzlement

Ex-Grady Memorial Hospital payroll director convicted of embezzlement

ATLANTA -- Grady Memorial Hospital Corporation's former payroll director has been found guilty of stealing nearly half a million dollars from the Atlanta hospital.

Donald Thomas, 55, was convicted of six counts each of theft and wire fraud, and two counts of bank fraud. He will be sentenced in February.

According to information presented in federal court, from January 2008 to June 2011, Thomas oversaw payroll for Grady's 5,500 employees. During that time, he made 134 fraudulent payments to himself by removing fired employees' bank account numbers from their payroll records and replacing them with his own.

U.S. Attorney Sally Quillian Yates said Thomas added vacation and severance pay for the former Grady employees, which was deposited into his personal bank account. In at least two instances, he created paper checks for payments to terminated employees, forged their signatures and took the money.